||50||: Healing Through Writing— Encouraging Quotes by Seasoned Writers

Blogger, Writer
Photo by Andrea Davis on
I am so happy and grateful to arrive at my 50th post, on to the next 50 and beyond!!! *Buzz Lightyear tone*.

I tend to seek perfection but really I’m scared, scared of sucking and feeling embarrassed and vulnerable about it. Scared to hear my own self admit that I’m scared and slightly lazy because the road ahead of me won’t be easy.
Even though I get in my own way, I love writing even though it can be exhausting and lonely because all the madness inside of me has some place to go.

You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence.

Octavia E. Butler

It feels empowering and exciting to create something that I’m proud of. If you’re a creator, writer and reader, I hope these quotes will be insightful, encouraging and help us all feel less lonely and more normalish for being bat shit crazy for wanting to be a writer.

And by the way, everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.

Sylvia Plath

Don’t be afraid to write crap, either:

Whatever it is—whatever it is, do it! Sure there are going to be mistakes. Everything’s not going to be perfect. I’ve written thousands of words that no one will ever see. I had to write them in order to get rid of them. But then I’ve written a lot of other stuff too. So the good stuff stays, and the old stuff goes.

from Bradbury’s 2000 CalTech from Commencement Speech.

If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. There’s no way around these two things that I’m aware of, no shortcut.

Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

You don’t become a writer by taking writing classes:

I took a writing course in summer school in 1939, when I was in high school. But it didn’t work. The secret of writing was, to go and live in the library two or four days a week for ten years. I graduated from the library having read every single book in it. And along the way I wrote every day of every week of every month, for every year. And in ten years, I became a writer.

from a 2010 interview with Rachel Goldstein, published in TIME

I am definitely searching for those stories, peeping for inspiration in all things; reading, writing, resting. I am listening to the experiences of others, I am praying & meditating, and I’m noticing moments of discomfort.

That’s where I am today, it’s 2020, we’ve past the half way mark and we’ll soon meet the holiday. What now? What will I spend each hour, each day doing to get closer to my main goal?

There’s a scripture that says 😆:

So okay― there you are in your room with the shade down and the door shut and the plug pulled out of the base of the telephone. You’ve blown up your TV and committed yourself to a thousand words a day, come hell or high water. Now comes the big question: What are you going to write about? And the equally big answer: Anything you damn well want.

Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft


I’m currently seeking peace, healing from trauma and the courage to receive healing and move forward. I believe I will receive that peace, healing, one courageous movement at a time, I’ll continue growing. Growth that personally makes me happy, and that proof for me looks like, a better version from whom I was yesterday. I believe that it is all possible once I make deliberate decisions and form new habits that add up to the main goal.

I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.

Anne Frank

Write only for yourself:

You can’t write for other people. You can’t write for the left or the right, this religion or that religion, or this belief or that belief. You have to write the way you see things. I tell people, Make a list of ten things you hate and tear them down in a short story or poem. Make a list of ten things you love and celebrate them.

from a 2010 interview with Sam Weller, published in The Paris Review

If you intend to write as truthfully as you can, your days as a member of polite society are numbered.

Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

“Our house, our relationship house, needs cleaning. It’s time to pick up, sweep out, get rid of the old, useless, worn out stuff that we have been hanging on to.”

— Iyanla Vanzant, In the Meantime

Write when the idea strikes:

The short story, if you really are intense and you have an exciting idea, writes itself in a few hours. I try to encourage my student friends and my writer friends to write a short story in one day so it has a skin around it, its own intensity, its own life, its own reason for being. There’s a reason why the idea occurred to you at that hour anyway, so go with that and investigate it, get it down. Two or three thousand words in a few hours is not that hard. Don’t let people interfere with you. Boot ’em out, turn off the phone, hide away, get it done. If you carry a short story over to the next day you may overnight intellectualize something about it and try to make it too fancy, try to please someone.

from a 2010 interview with Sam Weller, published in The Paris Review

Write a little every day:

Action is hope. At the end of each day, when you’ve done your work, you lie there and think, Well, I’ll be damned, I did this today. It doesn’t matter how good it is, or how bad—you did it. At the end of the week you’ll have a certain amount of accumulation. At the end of a year, you look back and say, I’ll be damned, it’s been a good year.

from a 2010 interview with Sam Weller, published in The Paris Review

People say, ‘What advice do you have for people who want to be writers?’ I say, they don’t really need advice, they know they want to be writers, and they’re gonna do it. Those people who know that they really want to do this and are cut out for it, they know it.

R.L. Stine
Best Wishes,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.